The House Health Care Plan: Bad Medicine for Children and Families

By Janet Murguía, President and CEO, NCLR

Some simple ways to evaluate the new congressional health care plan: when children are covered, they are healthier and do better in school. If they stay healthy, they will have more opportunities as adults. When families are covered, they are better protected from crippling medical debt and homelessness. When more people are covered, our country’s productivity and economic well-being are secured.

The “American Health Care Act” that House congressional leaders proposed last week will drop millions of children and working families from their Medicaid programs. It dismantles health care as we know it, trading in coverage of our nation’s most vulnerable populations for a financial windfall benefiting the wealthy few. And in an analysis released just this week, the Congressional Budget Office gave us our clearest picture yet of the harm the GOP proposal would inflict. The CBO estimates that 14 million people would lose coverage by 2018, 24 million by 2026, and federal Medicaid spending would be reduced by $880 billion over the next 10 years. In short, the historic coverage gains we’ve made over the past few years would be wiped away.

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This Week in Immigration Reform — Week Ending March 17

 Week Ending March 17

This week in immigration: NCLR responds to the President’s funding request to Congress; joins calls for congressional hearings on the immigration executive orders; the president’s Muslim and refugee ban is blocked again; and a new poll continues to show support for legal status not deportations.

NCLR tells Congress to reject funding requests for mass deportation: This week, the administration sent a spending request to Congress asking for $3 billion to expand its deportation force, immigrant detention camps, and for a border wall along the southern border. The administration also sent over its first budget for Fiscal Year 2018 which requested $4.5 billion dollars to implement its executive orders on immigration. “Rather than asking Congress to spend our taxpayer dollars on programs that would make our educational system more equitable, health care affordable and accessible, and the dream of owning a business or a home attainable—the White House is asking Congress for a check to push their agenda of intolerance,” said NCLR President and CEO Janet Murguía. To see some of the ways that $3 billion could be better spent, follow @NCLR on twitter or check out this post on the ways the $3 billion could be spent on education, childcare, the environment, job creation, and national service. To tell your senators to reject this request for new funding that will fund more ICE and CBP agents, new immigrant detention centers, and a border wall visit: nclr.us/nowall

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Local Educators Become Advocates

The fight continues at the federal level for educational equity, but states will be key to protecting Latino students

By John Marth, Senior Content Specialist, NCLR

The New York cohort of National Institute of Latino School Leaders

Nine educators met in New York’s Financial District for a two-day training about using their experiences with students and parents to advocate for state-level policies. It was the first of three training modules they’ll attend over the next eight months.

The group represents the sixth cohort of the National Institute of Latino School Leaders, or NILSL. NCLR developed the program five years ago to train educators working with Latino students to become more involved in education policy.

Previous NILSL groups consisted of fellows from across the country learning about lawmaking on the federal level. With the implementation of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) about to take effect, the program was modified to focus on states. “Now that ESSA’s passed, we need to make sure states are following it,” said Jessica Rodriguez Boudreau, NCLR Education Outreach Manager, who led the training. This year’s fellows come from Colorado and New York.

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Trump Administration Request to Fund Border Wall Is Un-American

It’s official: the president has made his supplemental budget request and submitted to Congress his first budget to fund his wall on our country’s southern border. And with the supplemental at $3 billion, taxpayers would be on the hook to fund the wall, a deportation force, border patrol agents, and detention facilities.

The budget request is meant to fund the strategy behind the three executive orders on immigration that led up to the president’s request today. Those orders created a ban on refugees and Muslims, authorized a new deportation force and new detention camps for asylum-seeking families, and a large-scale increase in border resources.

One thing is clear: Congress has the power to say NO. Without approval from Congress, the president cannot fully implement his anti-immigrant agenda

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