This Week in Immigration Reform — Week Ending September 23

Immigration_reform_Updates_blue

This week in immigration: National Academy of Sciences releases major report on immigration economic impact; Citizenship Day activities

National Academy of Sciences Report: An expert panel of the National Academy of Sciences, the nation’s most prestigious and respected source of independent and objective scientific analysis, released a major new report this week on The Economic and Fiscal Impacts of Immigration. Among the report’s major findings:

  • Immigration has an overall positive impact on long-run economic growth in the U.S.
  • There is little evidence that immigration significantly affects overall employment levels and wages of native-born workers; research finds slight positive effects for some groups and slight negative effects on other groups of native-born workers.
  • As adults, the children of immigrants are among the strongest fiscal contributors in the U.S. population, contributing more in taxes than…the rest of the native-born population.
  • The population of unauthorized immigrants shrank by over a million from 2007-2009, and has remained stable since.

Continue reading

Breaking Down the Census Data: Good News for Latinos But Not Enough to Close Gaps

By Yuqi Wang, Economic Policy Analyst, Economic Policy Project, NCLR

Demonstrators joined our Affiliate, Latin American Coalition, in North Carolina last week for a DAPA Day of Action, part of rallies that happened all across the country.

In 2015, Latinos were earning more, less likely to live in poverty, and more likely to have health insurance coverage than they did in 2014. This good news came from the recently released 2015 income and poverty data. A few bright spots in the data from the U.S. Census Bureau include:

  • The income of a typical Latino household income grew from $42,491 in 2014 to $45,148 in 2015. Latino households have not had this much money in their pockets since 2000 when median household income reached $45,649. This 6.1% jump from last year outpaced the 5.2% growth of the typical national household income
  • There were one million fewer Latinos living in poverty in 2015. The percentage of Latinos living in poverty fell by 2.2% between 2014 and 2015 while the national poverty rate decreased by 1.2% during the same time. 
  • Latinos saw the highest increase of health coverage. Health coverage grew by 3.6% in 2015, the most growth out of any racial or ethnic group.

Continue reading

Three Simple Tips for Parents to Support Their Children’s Learning During the School Year

By Jesus Sanchez, Fellow, National Institute for Latino School Leaders, NCLR

GSI_photo3

The summer has ended and students are back in school. As you reflect on your summer, think about all the wonderful things that happened, like vacations, time spent with family, visits to the local parks, and impromptu picnics. Summer is the perfect time to unwind, relax, and enjoy life.

However, with all the activity and action that summer brings, it’s easy to let learning become an afterthought. Even more, summer breaks keep children away from school just long enough to create a gap in learning, which often results in children losing ground on important academic skills.

Continue reading