This Week in Immigration Reform — Week Ending June 24

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Week Ending June 24

 This week in immigration: NCLR responds to Supreme Court decision.

Supreme Court keeps Administrative Relief on hold: We at NCLR are deeply disappointed by the Supreme Court’s 4–4 decision yesterday, which keeps DAPA and expanded DACA on hold. The decision ignores decades of legal precedent and disregards the previous uses of discretionary powers by presidents—leaving millions of American families in immigration limbo. The Committee for Immigration Reform Implementation released flyers in English and Spanish for use by community based organizations, available here. For a factsheet in English and Spanish explaining the decision click here.

NCLR President and CEO Janet Murguía said, “We are disappointed and heartbroken at this disheartening moment for families who are part of our American fabric and contribute so much to our nation. Not only does it dash the hopes of individuals, but it keeps our country from reaping the rewards of the social and economic contributions these policies encourage. Our community remains steadfast in our commitment to keeping hardworking families together and we will keep fighting for a permanent solution.” 

Janet also appeared on MSNBC’s Andrea Mitchell Reports, where she predicted the ruling will impact the upcoming elections, saying “I do anticipate that we will see a lot more [voter] mobilization efforts happening as a result of this decision.” Watch below:

We will continue to keep fighting because this is personal for us. Some of the news coverage of the decision included poignant reminders that this is about American families that are deeply embedded in our communities and contributing in so many ways to our country. DACA recipient Luba Cortes writes about what it was like growing up with an undocumented mother in the New York Times. DACA recipients and DAPA hopefuls vow to continue the push for reform in the Los Angeles Times. And a Xavier University student from Ohio shares what administrative relief would have meant to his family in the Cincinnati Enquirer.

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