Five Questions for NCLR Capital Awards Honoree Senator Cory Booker

Photo: Senate Democrats

Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.) Photo: Senate Democrats

At this evening’s Capital Awards, we’re also honoring Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.), for his work on reforming our juvenile justice system. The expected re-introduction of the “REDEEM Act” would help end the school-to-prison pipeline for young Latinos and give nonviolent criminals a better chance to find employment after they have served their sentences. We asked Sen. Booker about these efforts and about his rise to the U.S. Senate.

NCLR: What prompted you to decide on a career in public service?

Sen. Booker: My parents. There is a great saying by James Baldwin: “Children have never been very good at listening to their elders, but they have never failed to imitate them.” My parents worked for IBM while I was growing up but they were both so involved in public service and they both made sure my brother and I understood that we had the privileges and opportunities we did because of the work, struggle, service, and sacrifice of others. So I had a great model and feel that no matter your occupation, we all should have a passion for serving others because we are the product of such commitments to service.

NCLR: As it relates to juvenile justice, what are some of the concerns you hope will be addressed by the “REDEEM Act”?

Sen. Booker: We must fix our broken criminal justice system and reforms to our juvenile justice system are a critical piece of the puzzle. We need sensible, pragmatic reforms to keep kids out of an adult system in the first place and protect their privacy so a youthful mistake does not haunt young people throughout their lives.

We must ensure that children who make mistakes do not get stuck in a life of crime and instead grow up to be productive members of society. The “REDEEM Act” gives youth the chance to get nonviolent crimes expunged or sealed so they can move on with their lives and protect their privacy.

It would also ban the very cruel and counterproductive practice of juvenile solitary confinement that can have immediate and long-term detrimental effects on youth detainees’ mental and physical health. In fact, the majority of suicides by juveniles in prisons are committed by young people who are in solitary confinement. Other nations even consider it torture. Taken together, these measures will help keep kids who get in trouble out of a lifetime of crime.

NCLR: You’ve talked about increasing tech engagement and access for all, including communities of color. NCLR supports expanding broadband access for all, as well, when presently just 53 percent of Hispanic Americans report having this type of Internet access at home. Can you mention some ways the “Community Broadband Act” could address these gaps?

Sen. Booker: High-speed Internet access is no longer a luxury—it’s a necessity. By breaking down arbitrary barriers and allowing local communities to make meaningful investments in broadband, the “Community Broadband Act” aims to help bridge the digital divide wherever it persists. Sadly, the technology gap tends to be greatest in minority and low-income communities. It is my hope that the “Community Broadband Act” will create strong, economic alliances between municipalities, community members, businesses, and nonprofits, all of which stand to gain if localities provide broadband to their residents when existing broadband options are nonexistent or prove inadequate. The act will also bring a new level of affordability to broadband, which will enhance the online experience and allow for greater innovation and enable local governments to find tech solutions to some of our toughest problems.

NCLR: After President Obama announced his executive actions on immigration in November, you stated that “Congress must act to fix our broken immigration system and implement a long-term solution.” What are some of the points you would use to help make the case for permanent immigration reform?

Sen. Booker: I am encouraged by President Obama’s November 2014 executive actions on immigration. They were an important first step, but more needs to be done. At a time of great crisis in our country, when families are being separated, our nation is losing revenue, and we have an immigration policy that fails to accomplish our common goals; we must implement a comprehensive strategy that secures our border and strengthens our economy.

I support comprehensive immigration reform. Today, we have 11 million undocumented people living in the United States. They are hiding in the shadows, which presents a danger to our national security and harms our economy. It is unrealistic, and poor public policy, to simply deport hardworking undocumented immigrants, many of whom do critical jobs in our economy that help us to prosper.

We must pull individuals out of the shadows, not to grant them amnesty, but allow them to pay taxes and start on a path toward lawful immigration. Congress must act to fix our broken immigration system and implement a long-term solution—nothing less than America’s economic success, national security, and fundamental values are at stake.

NCLR: You have been very active in promoting pathways for women and people of color to become entrepreneurs as a way to foster economic growth. What specific national policies do you aim to champion to achieve this?

Sen. Booker: Small businesses and entrepreneurs are the economic engines of our nation, spurring innovation and creating jobs in our local communities. While entrepreneurship can offer great opportunities to build wealth or realize an innovative idea, too many women and minority entrepreneurs face steep hurdles to business ownership.

Access to capital is a critical issue for women and minority small-business owners and often serves as a significant barrier to business ownership. Recognizing these challenges, I have worked with the U.S. Small Business Administration to examine disparities in lending to women and minority-owned businesses in the agency’s 7(a) and 504 loan guarantee programs. Furthermore, in an effort to boost participation and awareness of these and other lending resources, last year I hosted five small-business forums across New Jersey that convened a broad spectrum of entrepreneurs and connected New Jersey business owners to federal and local resources. Going forward, I plan to continue leading this type of outreach to link business owners with the resources necessary to access capital and create jobs.

As a member of the Senate Small Business and Entrepreneurship Committee, I have also championed legislation to help drive startup resources to new areas. Currently, growth accelerator programs and other resources that support business startups are concentrated in Silicon Valley and even New York City. Forty-eight states across the country lack resources critical to startup growth, and legislation I introduced last year—the “Startup Opportunity Growth Accelerator (SOAR) Act”—would support a Small Business Administration fund to expand the impact of these resources by bringing accelerator programs to new communities. I plan to reintroduce this legislation this year.

Follow #NCLRCAPS15 on Twitter for live updates throughout the evening from the 2015 NCLR Capital Awards!

Five Questions for NCLR Capital Awards Honoree Frank Sharry

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Frank Sharry, Founder and Executive Director, America’s Voice

This evening we’re honoring Frank Sharry, Founder and Executive Director of America’s Voice, with the NCLR Capital Award for Public Service. We asked Sharry to share some insight with us on the state of the fight for comprehensive immigration reform.

NCLR: You have been an advocate for immigrants in this country for more than three decades. How would you describe that struggle as it stands today?

Sharry: After many ups and downs over many years, we have turned the corner and are now winning. In 2012, our movement followed the lead of DREAMers and helped win protection for hundreds of thousands of young undocumented immigrants. That same year, the Supreme Court dealt anti-immigrant legislation in states such as Arizona and Alabama a deathblow. Later in the year, the president was reelected with a strong showing from the Latino community, making it evident that immigration is a defining and mobilizing issue for many voters.

In 2013, the Senate passed a bipartisan immigration reform bill that would have allowed millions to get on a path to citizenship. In 2014, when the House of Representatives blocked reform, our movement compelled the president to announce historic policy changes through executive action. These will result in protection and work permits for millions of undocumented immigrants, and they will contain and restrict the formidable enforcement machinery that has ripped apart too many families.

Now, in 2015 our job is to defend these policy changes, implement them, and then, going forward, look to expand on them—until we have a Congress prepared to pass comprehensive immigration reform legislation that grants immediate legal status and achievable citizenship for the 11 million undocumented immigrants in America. Despite a terrible district court ruling and aggressive Republican opposition, I’m very optimistic that we will prevail and the new policies will be fully implemented.

NCLR: Taking into account the current political climate, do you think we are closer to comprehensive immigration reform, or are the challenges bigger than ever?

Sharry: I believe that comprehensive immigration reform is inevitable. It is the best policy to modernize our dysfunctional immigration system in a way that reflects our values and restores our confidence. And politically, it enjoys strong majority support in the country, support from constituencies across the political spectrum, and majorities in the Congress.

While it’s quite clear that for this Congress the Republican majority is more interested in nullifying the president’s executive actions than in passing pro-immigrant reforms, I am hopeful that the 2016 election will open space for comprehensive immigration legislation in 2017. In fact, it could be similar to what happened after the 2012 election, but on steroids.

If not, then until we have a Congress that will do what the American people want, we may have to rely on a combination of additional executive actions and state and local pro-immigrant policies that will give the majority of undocumented immigrants living in America work permits, driver’s licenses, access to higher education, worker protections, and travel permission. However long it takes, I think we’ve won the argument, we’ve won the politics, and we’re gaining strength every day as a movement. Victory is a matter of when, not if.

NCLR: NCLR and other organizations are making the case that President Obama’s executive actions are good not just for those who benefit directly, but for the country as a whole. Should advocates put more emphasis on these economic benefits to convince those in the general public who might be swayed by the argument that administrative relief puts jobs in danger?

Sharry: First of all, NCLR deserves enormous credit for its leadership on immigration reform. Without the organization’s dedication to this fight, I don’t think we would have made the progress we’ve made. And without Janet Murguía’s courage to speak out in 2014, I don’t think we would have won such a significant victory through executive action.

As for the best arguments for executive action, the economic case is a strong and persuasive one, especially for skeptics in the middle. There’s no doubt that protecting millions of hardworking immigrants will lead to higher productivity, more small business formation, increased tax revenues, higher wages, and more workplace fairness.

The argument that providing work permits to workers already in the country and in the workplace will take jobs away from others is all heat and no light. First of all, these workers are already here and already working. Being able to work legally, change jobs, and speak up without fear will help create a more level playing field in which the pressures are to increase fairness, wages, and revenues that benefit all of us.

NCLR: What’s the one thing that has changed the most for advocates since your time with ACNS and Centro Presente?

Sharry: The biggest change is that over time, in fits and starts, and through frequent internal turbulence, all of us have created one of the most powerful social and political movements of our generation.

Our movement is broad, deep, and aggressive. It includes DREAMers, immigrant leaders, grassroots activists, unusual allies, faith communities, ethnic communities, civil rights groups, the labor movement, national organizations, organizing networks, service providers, and millions of ordinary people who take part through actions, events, and social media campaigns.

I am honored and humbled to be part of such a beautiful and powerful expression of the need for far-reaching changes in how we, as a society, welcome and include newcomers.

NCLR: There are always ups and downs when working in public advocacy. How do you maintain your optimism?

Sharry: For one, I am confident we are on the right side of history and that the harder and smarter we work, the sooner we will achieve our destiny.

Second, I’m a happy warrior. I love that our movement is resilient, persistent, and creative, and I am inspired every day by my colleagues in the struggle.

But the most important reason I love this work is that I love the people we stand with and for. I love the strength, humanity, humor, and optimism. I love the ability to be dignified and resolute even when their dignity is under attack and their futures are uncertain. I love the love they have for family, culture, and the country they now call home. It’s a long, difficult road to victory, to be sure, but we will get there—and beyond. In fact, I want to live long enough to be there in the gallery of the House and Senate when, in the not-so-distant future, Congress enacts resolutions apologizing to undocumented immigrants from this generation and celebrating their remarkable contributions.

Follow #NCLRCAPS15 on Twitter for live updates throughout the evening from the 2015 NCLR Capital Awards.

Delaying Fair Pay for Home Care Workers is an Injustice

Caregiver_resizedThe Department of Labor (DOL) has sought to improve working conditions for home care workers by implementing a rule that grants these workers minimum wage and overtime protection. When the rule was finalized in September 2013, NCLR and its allies declared it a long-overdue victory for two million home care workers. Despite a full notice-and-comment process, accepting and considering tens of thousands of public comments, and an unprecedented 15-month implementation period, Judge Richard Leon of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia blocked the rule in January. In response, DOL has filed an appeal to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit.

We firmly support boosting wages for home care workers, and last week we joined in the submission of an amicus brief to support DOL in its appeal of Judge Leon’s ruling. Twenty percent of home care workers are Latino. Fair pay would not only help reduce high turnover in this industry, but would also bring stability and higher-quality care to those who depend on home care workers.

“The Supreme Court has already decided that DOL was well within its authority to grant these much-needed protections to home care workers. To continue to stall implementation of these rules—basic labor protections that home care workers have been excluded from for 40 years—is not only unjust, it is a slap in the face to those who we rely on to care for our loved ones,” said Eric Rodriguez, Vice President of the Office of Research, Advocacy, and Legislation at NCLR, in a statement. “Home care workers have waited long enough for fair pay. Further delay of these regulations is unacceptable.”

The legal underpinnings of DOL’s appeal are firm and we are confident in standing with the department. As the case makes its way through the legal system, we will continue to work with the states to help them build on the groundwork laid to implement these rules.

Weekly Washington Outlook — March 2, 2015

White House at Night

What to Watch This Week:

Congress:

House:

On Monday, the House will vote on two bills related to veterans’ issues under suspension of the rules:

  • H.R. 294 – Long-Term Care Veteran Choice Act, as amended (Sponsored by Rep. Jeff Miller / Veterans’ Affairs Committee)
  • H.R. 280 – To authorize the Secretary of Veterans Affairs to recoup bonuses and awards paid to employees of the Department of Veterans Affair, as amended (Sponsored by Rep. Jeff Miller / Veterans’ Affairs Committee)

On Tuesday, the House will convene for a joint meeting of Congress to receive Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.

On Wednesday and the balance of the week the House will consider the following:

  • H.R. 749 – Passenger Rail Reform and Investment Act of 2015, Rules Committee Print (Subject to a Rule) (Sponsored by Rep. Bill Shuster / Transportation and Infrastructure Committee)
  • H.R. 1029 - EPA Science Advisory Board Reform Act of 2015, Rules Committee Print (Subject to a Rule) (Sponsored by Rep. Frank Lucas / Science, Space, and Technology Committee)
  • H.R. 1030 – Secret Science Reform Act of 2015, Rules Committee Print (Subject to a Rule) (Sponsored by Rep. Lamar Smith / Science, Space, and Technology

It is possible that members may also vote on legislation to fund the Department of Homeland Security (DHS).

Senate:

On Monday, the Senate will resume consideration of a funding bill for the Department of Homeland Security. On Monday evening, a vote is scheduled on a House motion to go to conference to reconcile differences between each chamber’s appropriations bill. Later in the week, the Senate will join the House for a joint meeting to receive Israel’s Prime Minister. It is also possible that the Senate may schedule the first procedural vote to override the President’s veto of legislation to authorize the Keystone XL Pipeline or begin consideration of S. J. Res. 8 to block a proposed rule from the National Labor Relations Board.

White House:

On Monday, the president will meet with members of his Task Force on 21st Century Policing to discuss their recommendations on how to strengthen community policing and strengthen trust among law enforcement officers and the communities they serve.

On Tuesday, President Obama and the first lady will deliver remarks at the White House about expanding efforts to help adolescent girls worldwide attend and stay in school. These efforts will build on the investments successes achieved in global primary school education by elevating existing programs and public and private sector partnerships.

On Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, the president will attend meetings at the White House.

On Saturday, the president and the first lady will travel to Selma, Alabama to commemorate the 50th Anniversary of the Selma to Montgomery marches. This visit will also highlight the President and his Administration’s overall efforts to mark the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Voting Rights Act of 1965

Also this Week:

Appropriations – Last week, after the House failed to pass a three-week continuing resolution to fund the Department of Homeland Security in advance of a Friday deadline, both chambers extended their deadline seven days. This week, the Senate will vote on a House-passed motion to conference differing versions of an appropriations bill. The House version has language blocking the president’s immigration actions whereas the Senate passed a “clean” bill; as a result, this motion to negotiate between the two is almost certain to fail in the Senate. In the mean time, House leadership has not signaled how they plan to proceed to avert this Friday’s deadline to prevent a shutdown of the agency.

Immigration – As the fight over DHS funding continues, the House Judiciary Committee is scheduled on Tuesday and Wednesday to mark-up four bills, including an updated version of the SAFE Act and related legislation on interior enforcement (i.e. E-Verify).  The Committee will also consider two bills to expedite the return of unaccompanied children and make other changes to the processing of asylum claims. In the Senate, the Judiciary Committee’s Immigration and National Interest Subcommittee will hold a hearing Tuesday afternoon on “Oversight of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services: Ensuring Agency Priorities Comply with the Law.” Representatives from USCIS are scheduled to appear.

Education – In the midst of last week’s wrangling over DHS appropriations, planned consideration of the Student Success Act, a partisan bill to rewrite No Child Left Behind, was pulled off the floor. There is wide speculation that with minimal Democratic support and concerns from conservative members that the bill did not go far enough, House Leadership did not have enough votes for passage. The legislation is not scheduled to return to the floor this week and its fate is somewhat unclear at the moment.  In the Senate, HELP Committee Chairman Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.) and Ranking Member Patty Murray (D-Wash.) continue to negotiate to reach a bipartisan compromise to reauthorize the law.

Health – The Supreme Court will hear oral arguments on Wednesday in the King v. Burwell case challenging the legality of premium assistance for enrollees on federal exchanges. Lawmakers in the House and the Senate have signaled they may be interested in finding a “fix” if the court rules against the Administration. Last week, Senate Finance Committee Chairman Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) made limited details of one possible proposal public with several Senate colleagues, available in a Washington Post op-ed.  The Administration, however, remains confident the court will rule in their favor.  Additional details here: http://www.scotusblog.com/case-files/cases/king-v-burwell/.

Dodd-Frank – Richard Cordray, the Director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, will appear before the House Financial Services Committee on Tuesday. The hearing is expected to be somewhat contentious and may address conservative proposals to change the agency’s structure.

Budget – Cabinet officials are continuing to appear before Congress to make this week defending their budget requests. Notably on Wednesday, Education Secretary Arne Duncan will testify before the House Appropriations Labor-HHS-Education Subcommittee.

Labor – The Senate could vote as soon as this week on S. J. Res. 8, a resolution of disapproval of the National Labor Relations Board’s actions to expedite workplace union elections when unions are engaged in collective bargaining.

This Week in Immigration Reform — Week Ending Feb. 27

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Week Ending February 27

This week in immigration reform: Janet Murguía and advocates meet with President Obama on immigration; NCLR launches a new blog series; the Department of Homeland Security funding debate continues; and NCLR gears up for National Latino Advocacy Days.

NCLR kept the community informed on immigration with staff quoted in Slate and EFE Newswire and featured on Kansas City Public Radio.

President Obama meets with advocates and participates in townhall on immigration: This week Janet Murguía attended a meeting with President Obama where he encouraged advocates to continue to get out the word about DAPA and the broader eligibility for DACA. The president also told advocates at the meeting that, despite the temporary delay of the implementation of expanded DACA and DAPA because of the court injunction, the priorities enforcement memo from November 2014 is in effect and the administration will continue to prioritize public safety, national security, and border security. Read more in a Huffington Post article. Murguía tweeted about the meeting (below) and made a statement afterwards, saying “the law is on our side and that while we need to move forward through the legal process, we believe that we will win this case and make sure that we can move forward with implementation with the executive order.” Watch a video of her complete statement.

The president continued defense of his executive action on immigration during an appearance with MSNBC anchor Jose Diaz-Balart for an immigration town hall in Miami. Watch the video in our blog. Additionally, President Obama wrote an op-ed in The Hill urging comprehensive immigration reform.

NCLR launches a blog profiling deferred action success stories: A new blog series began this week with the story of Emilio Vicente, a DACA recipient and soon-to-be college graduate. Emilio has advocated for immigration reform, is an active member of his university community, and hopes to continue his work on immigration upon graduation from the University of North Carolina. On what DACA has meant for him, Emilio said:

“DACA for me means not being under the threat of deportation at any moment and being able to use my degree once I graduate. I can also sleep better at night knowing that my brothers and sisters-in-law, who qualify for DAPA, won’t be deported and separated from their families at any moment. We need a humane immigration bill that is permanent but until then, DACA and DAPA will protect many of us from the separation of our families.”

The blog, ‘Living the American DREAM,’ will also profile individuals who will come forward to apply for the expanded DACA and new Deferred Action for Parental Accountability (DAPA) programs.

Congress continues to debate funding for DHS, which expires at midnight: The fight over how to fund the Department of Homeland Security has played out all week on the Hill. Just today, the Senate passed an amended version of HR 240, a ‘clean’ DHS funding bill to fully fund the agency through the fiscal year. House Republicans might try to call a conference committee to negotiate a final bill and to potentially add language into the bill to prevent implementation of executive action. Minority Leader Reid (D-Nev.) has vowed to block a conference committee and is quoted in an article from The Hill saying: “If they send over a bill with all the riders in it, they’ve shut down the government. We’re not going to play games.”

The Senate then proceeded to vote on a bill by Senator Collins (R-Maine) that would overturn President Barack Obama’s most recent immigration actions. That vote failed 57-42. In the House, Republicans attempted to pass a short-term continuing resolution to fund DHS through March 19. That vote failed 203-224. It is unclear how Congress will proceed and NCLR will keep you informed as this debate continues.

Latino advocates come to the Washington next week to voice concerns and support for their communities: Next week, 300 Latino leaders from 23 states and the District of Columbia will come to Washington D.C. for National Latino Advocacy Days. NCLR is excited to welcome members of the NCLR Affiliate network and will be facilitating a day-long training to prepare participants before they visit their elected officials.

A Chat About the Role of Community Health Workers in Communities of Color: Highlights

Today NCLR joined our friends at Peers for Progress and Black Women’s Health Imperative for a twitter chat on how community health workers are vital to improving minority health. We’ve put together some highlights for you. Thanks to Black Women’s Health Imperative and Peers for Progress for working to produce this spirite Twitter chat today!

The Real Problem with Sean Penn’s Green Card Joke at the Oscars

By Janet Murguía, President and CEO, NCLR

As I was watching the final moments of a very long Oscars telecast, all but certain that Birdman was about to be announced Best Picture, I was not offended so much as baffled when Sean Penn joked about Mexican director Alejandro G. Iñárritu’s green card since Penn, while a talented actor, is not known for being a bigot or, for that matter, funny.

I realize that both Penn and Iñárritu later said that this was some good-natured ribbing between friends, an inside joke. But I also understand—and they should, too—why so many people in the Latino community took offense. Even on the most triumphant Oscar night ever for someone of Hispanic heritage, Penn’s joke reinforced what Latinos have long suspected: our perception—borne out of history and experience—that Hollywood believes our community does not belong at the Academy Awards. Not only were there no Hispanic acting nominees, but a Latino has not been nominated for Best Actor since 2011, or a Latina for Best Actress since 2006. If you are a U.S.-born Hispanic, the landscape is even grimmer: no Best Actor nomination since 1988 and no Best Actress nomination since… ever. That’s right: no U.S.-born Latina has ever been nominated for Best Actress. In nearly a century of Oscars, you can count the number of total acting awards won by Latinos on one hand… plus an extra finger.

Our virtual invisibility at all Hollywood award shows—not just the Oscars—is why NCLR created the NCLR ALMA Awards® 20 years ago. We realized that if the many contributions of Latino talent both on-screen and behind the camera were going to be recognized and honored, we would have to do it ourselves. Unfortunately, two decades later, that still seems to be the case. After 15 ALMA shows honoring hundreds of Latinos and Latinas in Hollywood, the Oscars still managed to only showcase a couple of us—Jennifer Lopez and Zoe Saldana—as presenters on Sunday night’s show.

But we also do ourselves a disservice by dwelling on Penn’s dopey, spur-of-the-moment quip because it overshadows the best moment for Latinos on television in a long time: Iñárritu’s Best Picture acceptance remarks. It is a tribute to Iñárritu that in the greatest moment of his career thus far, he chose to focus on the plight of those who are too often invisible. He said, “I just pray [Mexicans here in the United States] can be treated with the same dignity and respect of the ones that came before and built this incredible immigrant nation.”

In just one sentence, Iñárritu captured the hopes and dreams of the nation’s 55 million Latinos. And he did so in front of the estimated billion people around the world watching the event, giving voice to something never before heard on such a large scale. The best way to make sure that people forget Penn’s crassness is for us to make sure that people do not forget these timeless and eloquent words.

Consumer Protections Are Under Attack!

By Nancy Wilberg Ricks, Senior Policy and Communications Strategist, NCLR

CFPB_LogoLatino families have benefitted from consumer protections that were created to prevent another economic crisis. These protections were established through the Dodd-Frank Act of 2010. As you may know, Dodd-Frank created a new federal agency solely dedicated to serving the consumer—the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB). Since the CFPB opened its doors in 2011, we have seen a more consumer-focused economy for the 21st century.

Many families have already benefitted from the CFPB:

  • It made wiring money abroad easier and more transparent.
  • It eliminated many bad credit card practices.
  • It wiped out many mortgage lending tricks and traps that got us into the housing crisis.

These successes are very important to ensuring that families, not just the banks, thrive. Unfortunately, they are under threat by policymakers striving to roll back strong regulations. Take a look at some of the changes being proposed:

  • Impairing the Bureau’s strong leadership. One problematic proposal is to replace the CFPB’s director with a less effective team of five commissioners. Historically, five-member boards have hobbled decision-making and increased gridlock.
  • Chipping away at its funding. As with every banking agency, the CFPB’s independent funding insulates it from the partisan attacks. Dodd-Frank established this funding stream of nontaxpayer dollars for the Bureau from the Federal Reserve.
  • Imposing unwarranted bureaucratic burdens and diminishing authority over nonbanks. In 2010, Congress gave the CFPB authority to oversee previously unregulated entities, such as debt collectors, remittance providers, and payday lenders—industries that have taken advantage of consumers with high fees and unscrupulous practices.

Many of you helped achieve these victories for families by supporting the CFPB. We need your help once again. Lend your name to our petition and help protect the CFPB from these harmful proposals!

President Obama’s Immigration Town Hall — Full Video

Last night, President Obama joined MSNBC anchor Jose Diaz-Balart for an immigration town hall. The president answered some tough questions from Diaz-Balart and the audience and reiterated his defense of his administrative relief. Watch the full video below.

Living the American DREAM: Emilio Vicente

Living the Dream-01 (2)

Today we are starting a weekly series highlighting people who have come forward and applied for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), as well as those who will be coming forward to apply for expanded DACA or Deferred Action for Parents of Americans and Lawful Permanent Residents (DAPA). Since President Obama announced DACA in 2012, more than 638,000 people have received deferred action, meaning they can live without the fear of deportation and continue their contributions with a work permit. While DACA does not provide a path to citizenship, we know that it has been transformative as recipients are able to pursue their dreams and improve their economic well-being.

The expansion of DACA and DAPA has brought hope to millions of immigrants and families, including those who were initially unable to apply for DACA because they were over the age of 31. The president’s plan to expand DACA and establish DAPA would let up to 5.2 million more people live without the fear of losing a loved one due to deportation policies. When he announced that he was using his legitimate authority, we heard from our network that administrative relief would change their lives and keep their families together.

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Emilio Vicente (in blue) with Eva Longoria (left), NCLR President and CEO, Janet Murguía, and MSNBC anchor, Jose Diaz-Balart (right) at the 2013 NCLR Annual Conference

One person who has benefited from DACA and who has created incredible opportunities to give back to his community is Emilio Vicente. Emilio grew up in North Carolina and is currently a senior at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. We met him back in 2010 when he was regularly traveling from North Carolina to Washington, DC, to share his story with his senators and urging them to support the DREAM Act. Emilio became a regular at his senators’ events; the senators and their staff knew that he was there to deliver a message of the DREAM Act’s implications for him and for his state. He continued his advocacy efforts for immigration reform, joining NCLR during the National Latino Advocacy Days in 2011, and serving as a member of the NCLR Líderes Youth Advisory Committee. He also participated in a town hall panel at the NCLR Annual Conference in New Orleans alongside NCLR President and CEO Janet Murguía and Eva Longoria.

During this time, Emilio has worked at competitive internships in Seattle and Washington, DC, and has raised money for scholarships for undocumented youth. Last year, Emilio ran for UNC student body president and drew the attention of national press in doing so. The New York Times reporter who spent time with him during the campaign described Emilio as a “one-man whirlwind of engagement.”

On what DACA has meant for him, Emilio said:

“DACA for me means not being under the threat of deportation at any moment and being able to use my degree once I graduate. I can also sleep better at night knowing that my brothers and sisters-in-law, who qualify for DAPA, won’t be deported and separated from their families at any moment. We need a humane immigration bill that is permanent but until then, DACA and DAPA will protect many of us from the separation of our families.”

Once he graduates in the spring, Emilio hopes to continue advocating for immigration reform in Washington, DC. Receiving DACA will allow him to put his incredible talent and experience to use—so Washington better look out!