Trump’s Budget: A Slash-and-Burn Approach that Will Hurt Americans

Today the president released his first full budget proposal for the fiscal year 2018, and it’s as bad as we expected. Included in the plan are drastic cuts to many of the most successful assistance programs that have helped working and middle-class families move ahead during tough economic times. It would cut $1.7 trillion in funding that provides a lifeline to millions of Americans, and it would gut key programs that help families afford food, housing, and health care.

A budget is a moral document that should reflect our values. The Trump Budget is an assault on children and working families.

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Brown v. Board 63 Years Later

Photo: Wikipedia

As more and more Latinos succeed in school, it’s important to recognize the long road it took for them to get there. Graduation rates and test scores for Latinos are the highest they’ve ever been, and more Latinos are entering college. And while there are outdated systems that keep many of our children from having the tools to succeed, we’ve come a long way since 1954, when the Supreme Court decided that segregating schools is un-American. Still, 63 years later, schools are experiencing the effects of those systems.

On this day in 1954, the Supreme Court delivered a landmark decision in Brown v. Board of Education, ordering the desegregation of our nation’s public schools. While segregation in schools doesn’t exist in the same context as it did then, it continues to be an issue. Last year, a Government Accountability Office report showed a sharp increase over the last decade in what they classify as isolated schools, where more than three-quarters of the student population is of the same race/ethnicity. Interestingly, this isolation is happening most in some of our country’s most diverse states and cities. In states like California, Texas, and New York, more than half of their Latino students attend schools that are more than 90% Latino.

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How the Trump Presidency is Making Latinos Feel After 100 Days in Office

As we close in on Donald Trump’s 100th day as president, we wanted to hear from our Action Network about how they thought the president was doing so far. So, we asked them to describe in one word how they have felt about Mr. Trump’s time in office.

The response was overwhelming.

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Trump Administration Request to Fund Border Wall Is Un-American

It’s official: the president has made his supplemental budget request and submitted to Congress his first budget to fund his wall on our country’s southern border. And with the supplemental at $3 billion, taxpayers would be on the hook to fund the wall, a deportation force, border patrol agents, and detention facilities.

The budget request is meant to fund the strategy behind the three executive orders on immigration that led up to the president’s request today. Those orders created a ban on refugees and Muslims, authorized a new deportation force and new detention camps for asylum-seeking families, and a large-scale increase in border resources.

One thing is clear: Congress has the power to say NO. Without approval from Congress, the president cannot fully implement his anti-immigrant agenda

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We’re Standing United Against Hate in Our Communities

This week, NCLR joined 11 other prominent national organizations to address the disturbing spike in hate incidents across the country. The initiative, Communities Against Hate, is led by The Leadership Conference Education Fund and the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law. A major part of the initiative is launching a database to bring visibility to hate incidents, and helping victims and organizations get access to legal resources and social services through a newly established hotline: (844) 9 NOHATE, or (844) 966-4283. You can also report incidents online at: nclr.us/CommunitiesAgainstHate

Communities Against Hate marks the first time organizations that represent a diverse set of impacted communities—including the Black, Latino, LGBTQ, Muslim, Arabs, and women—have joined together to aggregate data on hate incidents. The initiative will pull together traditionally separate reporting of hate incidents and provide support for victims and communities. This pairing of services and documentation is unprecedented and especially critical in our current social climate.

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