NCLR President and CEO Responds to DHS Actions on DACA, DAPA


In response to a new memo released yesterday by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) on the continuation of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program and the rescission of the Deferred Action for Parents of Americans and Lawful Permanent Residents (DAPA) program, NCLR President and CEO Janet Murguía issued the following statement:

“While we applaud the administration’s apparent decision to keep DACA in place, today’s action is far from reassuring. The announcement that DACA would not be repealed was coupled with a decision to formally revoke DAPA, which would have given temporary protected status to an estimated five million parents of U.S. citizens. Further, the Trump administration took pains to note that they have not yet decided on DACA’s long-term future, as if the benefits to our economy, our society and the more than 750,000 young people beginning their adult lives in the only country they have ever known can be debated or denied. Claiming that DACA recipients are safe, while ending protections for parents and issuing executive orders to increase an already draconian enforcement policy does not actually ensure their safety or anyone else’s. This is why NCLR will continue to protect and defend the Latino and immigrant communities in the United States, and continue advocating for commonsense, comprehensive immigration reform.”

NCLR Stands with Texas Communities Opposed to SB 4

At the June 2017 meeting in Phoenix, the NCLR Board of Directors unanimously passed a resolution opposing Texas Senate Bill 4 (SB 4).

The Texas law, which goes into effect in September if implemented, is reminiscent of Arizona’s infamous SB 1070 law—the “show me your papers” bill. That bill also sought to force local and state law enforcement to act as U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) officers. SB 4 would allow law enforcement to engage in racial profiling of Hispanic communities in Texas, and make it permissible for police officers to inquire about anyone’s immigration status.

Despite backlash from police chiefs all over Texas, SB 4 asserts that should law enforcement officers choose not to comply with these new duties, they could face Class A misdemeanor charges and a hefty fine.

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Trump’s Budget: A Slash-and-Burn Approach that Will Hurt Americans

Today the president released his first full budget proposal for the fiscal year 2018, and it’s as bad as we expected. Included in the plan are drastic cuts to many of the most successful assistance programs that have helped working and middle-class families move ahead during tough economic times. It would cut $1.7 trillion in funding that provides a lifeline to millions of Americans, and it would gut key programs that help families afford food, housing, and health care.

A budget is a moral document that should reflect our values. The Trump Budget is an assault on children and working families.

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Brown v. Board 63 Years Later

Photo: Wikipedia

As more and more Latinos succeed in school, it’s important to recognize the long road it took for them to get there. Graduation rates and test scores for Latinos are the highest they’ve ever been, and more Latinos are entering college. And while there are outdated systems that keep many of our children from having the tools to succeed, we’ve come a long way since 1954, when the Supreme Court decided that segregating schools is un-American. Still, 63 years later, schools are experiencing the effects of those systems.

On this day in 1954, the Supreme Court delivered a landmark decision in Brown v. Board of Education, ordering the desegregation of our nation’s public schools. While segregation in schools doesn’t exist in the same context as it did then, it continues to be an issue. Last year, a Government Accountability Office report showed a sharp increase over the last decade in what they classify as isolated schools, where more than three-quarters of the student population is of the same race/ethnicity. Interestingly, this isolation is happening most in some of our country’s most diverse states and cities. In states like California, Texas, and New York, more than half of their Latino students attend schools that are more than 90% Latino.

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How the Trump Presidency is Making Latinos Feel After 100 Days in Office

As we close in on Donald Trump’s 100th day as president, we wanted to hear from our Action Network about how they thought the president was doing so far. So, we asked them to describe in one word how they have felt about Mr. Trump’s time in office.

The response was overwhelming.

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