This Week in Immigration Reform

Week Ending April 14

This week in immigration: NCLR produces a “Know Your Rights: Financial Safety” checklist in English and Spanish; nearly 1500 economists agree immigration strengthens the economy; upcoming webinar discusses partnerships for community education and immigration screenings.

Tools you can use: This week, NCLR produced a “Know Your Rights: Financial Safety” checklist, which outlines the important steps people can take to protect their financial security and that of their loved ones if facing deportation or detention. The informative tool offers guidance and tips on a broad array of financial matters including accessing bank accounts, managing a mortgage or a lease, and filing taxes, among other topics. The checklists are available in English and Spanish.

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This Week in Immigration Reform — Week Ending March 31

Week Ending March 31

This week in immigration: Community leaders mobilize to push back against funding for the administration’s mass deportation force during the NCLR Community Leaders Action Summit; NCLR and Senate Democrats stand with families impacted by the administration’s cruel and misguided deportation policies; NCLR Capital Awards honors leaders standing up for our community.

Community Leaders at NCLR Action Summit Mobilize for Stronger Communities, Stronger America: As part of this week’s Community Leaders Action Summit, Latino advocates, youth and civic leaders from throughout the nation had a clear message for their congressional representatives: End the assault on millions of American families and refuse to fund President Trump’s mass deportation tactics and border wall. During nearly 100 visits with members of Congress, community advocates urged their representatives to stand up for and defend policies that benefit millions of American families. “The NCLR Community Leaders Action Summit was an important and needed gathering of Latino leaders from throughout the nation who have witnessed first-hand how this administration’s cruel deportation policies have hurt families and communities,” said NCLR President and CEO Janet Murguía.

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This Week in Immigration Reform — Week Ending March 17

 Week Ending March 17

This week in immigration: NCLR responds to the President’s funding request to Congress; joins calls for congressional hearings on the immigration executive orders; the president’s Muslim and refugee ban is blocked again; and a new poll continues to show support for legal status not deportations.

NCLR tells Congress to reject funding requests for mass deportation: This week, the administration sent a spending request to Congress asking for $3 billion to expand its deportation force, immigrant detention camps, and for a border wall along the southern border. The administration also sent over its first budget for Fiscal Year 2018 which requested $4.5 billion dollars to implement its executive orders on immigration. “Rather than asking Congress to spend our taxpayer dollars on programs that would make our educational system more equitable, health care affordable and accessible, and the dream of owning a business or a home attainable—the White House is asking Congress for a check to push their agenda of intolerance,” said NCLR President and CEO Janet Murguía. To see some of the ways that $3 billion could be better spent, follow @NCLR on twitter or check out this post on the ways the $3 billion could be spent on education, childcare, the environment, job creation, and national service. To tell your senators to reject this request for new funding that will fund more ICE and CBP agents, new immigrant detention centers, and a border wall visit: nclr.us/nowall

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This Week in Immigration Reform — Week Ending March 10

Week Ending March 10

This week in immigration: NCLR responds to the President’s Muslim ban 2.0; continued efforts of the administration’s deportation force.

NCLR responds to the administration’s Muslim Ban 2.0 This week, President Trump signed another executive order that bans travel to the U.S. from six Muslim-majority countries and halts refugee resettlement. The executive order follows the decision by the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals to block the initial executive order.  NCLR President and CEO, Janet Murguía, tweeted:

Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson has asked the federal judge that issued a halt to the ban under the first executive order to find that his order applies to the second ban as well. If the judge agrees, the government would not be able to put the new ban into effect next Thursday as scheduled, without further action from the court.

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This Week in Immigration Reform — Week Ending March 3

Week Ending March 3

This week in immigration: NCLR responds to the President’s address to a joint session of Congress and highlights additional tools for advocates.

NCLR responds to president’s address to a joint session of Congress: This week, the president gave an address to a joint session of Congress and NCLR expressed continued deep concern over President Trump’s pursuit of policies that undermine the significant progress made by Latinos and other diverse communities across the United States. “President Trump’s moderated tone and soft overtures to bipartisanship do not make the policies he has implemented and defended mightily in this speech any less harsh,” said NCLR President and CEO Janet Murguía. “The policies are still the policies he has been touting since the beginning of the campaign, and his justifications are still as hyperbolic and fictional as they’ve ever been.”

In an op-ed published in The Hill, Janet Murguía noted that the President’s statements continue to peddle fiction about the immigrant community, writing “Last night, President Trump painted immigrants with the same ugly, broad brush he used during the campaign. It was a slur then and it is a slur now.”

Meanwhile, in the Capitol as guests of many Democratic members of congress, refugees, DREAMers, DACA recipients, and U.S. citizen children whose mother has been deported spoke out about the impact that the president’s policies are having on them and on their communities. In addition to the guests in the audience, Astrid Silva, one of the more than 750,000 DACA recipients in the country, delivered the Democratic Party’s response in Spanish.

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