This Week in Immigration Reform — Week Ending March 3

Week Ending March 3

This week in immigration: NCLR responds to the President’s address to a joint session of Congress and highlights additional tools for advocates.

NCLR responds to president’s address to a joint session of Congress: This week, the president gave an address to a joint session of Congress and NCLR expressed continued deep concern over President Trump’s pursuit of policies that undermine the significant progress made by Latinos and other diverse communities across the United States. “President Trump’s moderated tone and soft overtures to bipartisanship do not make the policies he has implemented and defended mightily in this speech any less harsh,” said NCLR President and CEO Janet Murguía. “The policies are still the policies he has been touting since the beginning of the campaign, and his justifications are still as hyperbolic and fictional as they’ve ever been.”

In an op-ed published in The Hill, Janet Murguía noted that the President’s statements continue to peddle fiction about the immigrant community, writing “Last night, President Trump painted immigrants with the same ugly, broad brush he used during the campaign. It was a slur then and it is a slur now.”

Meanwhile, in the Capitol as guests of many Democratic members of congress, refugees, DREAMers, DACA recipients, and U.S. citizen children whose mother has been deported spoke out about the impact that the president’s policies are having on them and on their communities. In addition to the guests in the audience, Astrid Silva, one of the more than 750,000 DACA recipients in the country, delivered the Democratic Party’s response in Spanish.

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This Week in Immigration Reform — Week Ending February 24

Week Ending February 24

This week in immigration: NCLR responds to immigration enforcement memos.

NCLR responds to immigration enforcement memos: This week, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) issued new memos outlining how the administration would implement the Executive Orders signed by President Trump on January 25. The implementation memos serve as a mass deportation blueprint. NCLR condemned this unnecessary and wasteful plan. “It opens the floodgates to terrorizing millions of people in this country—citizens and noncitizens alike—to combat a nonexistent immigrant crime wave. Or, to put in the words of this administration, based on ‘fake news,” stated NCLR President and CEO Janet Murguía. “We will do everything in our power to protect and defend our community in the face of this unconscionable assault on our civil rights,” Murguía added.

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This Week in Immigration Reform — Week Ending February 17

Week Ending February 17

This week in immigration: NCLR responds to immigration enforcement actions; shares information on Telemundo town hall on immigration; and responds to A Day Without Immigrants.

NCLR responds to enforcement actions: This week we continued to see chaos that erupted as a direct consequence of President Trump’s Executive Orders and his full-speed ahead order to immigration agents to arrest and detain any and all undocumented immigrants they encounter.

Millions of American families are feeling anxious as a result of the scorched-earth approach this administration is pursuing. This follows the deportation of Guadalupe Garcia de Rayos, a long-time Arizona resident and mother of two U.S. citizens when she went for a check in with the local immigration office. Earlier this week, another mother of U.S. citizens with strong ties to her community took sanctuary in a church in Colorado.  NCLR President and CEO, Janet Murguia took to twitter to state that deporting hard-working moms who pose no threat does not make anyone safer but does destroy families.

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This Week In Immigration Reform — Week Ending February 3

Post-Inauguration Edition

Post-Inauguration Updates: NCLR responds to executive orders; Resources regarding the executive orders; NCLR continues to mount opposition to the nomination of Senator Jeff Sessions to be Attorney General.

NCLR Responds to Executive Orders: Last week, the president signed a number of executive orders that prove an unprecedented capacity to ignore the facts, flout the norms of public discourse, and declare open season on the nation’s immigrants and 55 million Americans of Hispanic descent. The executive orders include plans to move forward with building a wall on the Mexican border, ramp up deportations and go after cities refusing to transform their local law enforcement into immigration agents. The president also signed an extreme and inhumane executive order that would suspend immigration from a host of Muslim-majority countries and stop refugee from some countries. “We do not turn our backs on vulnerable people fleeing persecution and horrific violence. That is not who we are or who we ought to be. In short, these orders are as un-American as it gets,” stated NCLR President and CEO Janet Murguía.

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This Week in Immigration Reform — Week Ending November 18

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Week Ending November 18

Post-Election Updates: NCLR responds to election results; Resources to share with community members regarding immigration; NCLR responds to nomination of Senator Sessions for Attorney General.

NCLR responds to election outcome: Following the election results last week, NCLR President and CEO, Janet Murguía stated, “It is fair to say that the whole country, including the Latino community, was surprised by the outcome in this presidential election. We cherish the democratic process, acknowledge the results of this election, and are open to hearing from the president-elect about his plans. But Donald Trump’s harsh and divisive rhetoric, his extreme proposals, and the fact that his outreach to our community during his campaign was nonexistent, have fostered legitimate and significant concerns about the future, for our community and for our nation.” Read NCLR’s full statement here.

NCLR has joined more than 120 national organizations in calling on President-elect Trump to denounce hate acts and ideology that is driving them.

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