CFPB’s New Consumer Protection: Restrict Forced Arbitration

By Renato Rocha, Policy Analyst, Economic Policy, UnidosUS

The same week we announced our new name—UnidosUS—the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) issued a final rule that prohibits financial contracts from having forced arbitration clauses with class action bans. In effect, the new rule restores the right of consumers to come together in court by prohibiting class action bans, giving consumers a way to unite and hold corporations accountable for systemic misconduct.

Forced arbitration is a rigged system. Often, forced arbitration requires consumers to take a dispute to a private arbitrator chosen by the company, rather than exercise their right to have their complaint heard before a court. Given the association between the company and the arbitrator, forced arbitration causes considerable unfairness to consumers.

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Giving Credit Where it’s Due: Latinos and Credit Scores

By Agatha So, Policy Analyst, Economic Policy Project, NCLR
Family in front of house

In the run up to the Great Recession, Latinos and other low-income homebuyers of color more often than not received higher-priced mortgage loans than White borrowers. Today, Latinos and low-income communities of color are still being short-changed in the mortgage market.

In 2015, few mortgages were made to Latino and Black borrowers, with 8% of all home purchase loans made to Latinos, and only 5% going to Black borrowers. Tight lending standards have made it difficult for millions of Americans to buy a home since the Great Recession, especially for Latinos and low-income families with credit scores below 700. While the minimum credit score needed to qualify for a home loan has increased by 40 points, the credit scores of Latinos who receive mortgages have increased by nearly 80 points since 2000.  Moreover, Latino borrowers are less likely than White borrowers to have a credit score and full credit history, making them appear riskier to lenders than they really are.

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Is Homeownership Just a Dream for Latino Millennials?

By Agatha So, Policy Analyst, Economic Policy Project, NCLR

Family in front of home

While American families who bought a home before the Great Recession were likely most concerned with the interest rates of their home loan, today’s millennials might be more preoccupied with the interest rates and repayment plans on their student loans.

Nearly 70 percent of bachelor’s degree recipients leave school with debt. Student loan debt is one of the largest burdens carried by Americans today, second only to mortgage debt. As a result, it comes as no surprise that student loan debt may be holding back millennials, especially older millennials, from buying a home.

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Six Trends That Show Latino Homeownership is Important to the Housing Market and the Economy

By Agatha So, Policy Analyst, Economic Policy Project, NCLR

Headlines about the nation’s housing market have focused on the low homeownership rate, currently stalled at 63%, compared to a high in 2001 of more than 73%. Yet, little attention has been paid to the impact of the low Hispanic homeownership rate on America’s ongoing economic recovery, and in turn, the future of the nation’s housing market.

Overlooking this impact is a huge oversight, given that the majority of new households formed in the next two decades will be made up by homeowners of color. In fact, Latinos are expected to account for 40% of those new households. At the end of 2016, the Hispanic homeownership rate increased to 47%, but remained much lower than the peak of 50% nearly 10 years ago. With significant household growth on the horizon, creditworthy Latinos need access to homeownership to ensure that the opportunity to build wealth is available to all Americans in the decades to come.

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Latinos Overwhelmingly Support Consumer Protection

By Renato Rocha, Policy Analyst, Economic Policy Project, NCLR

In less than six years since opening its doors, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) has brought transparency to the remittance industry, stopped credit card companies from adding on products that consumers never agreed to, and required mortgage lenders to ask applicants for proof of their income before making home loans. Its creation is one of the most important accomplishments of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010.

Despite the CFPB’s hard work on behalf of American families, efforts are underway to dismantle the agency. One such attempt is the “Financial Choice Act of 2017,” House Financial Services Committee Chairman Jeb Hensarling’s vehicle to de-regulate the financial industry and dismantle the CFPB.

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