Is Homeownership Just a Dream for Latino Millennials?

By Agatha So, Policy Analyst, Economic Policy Project, NCLR

Family in front of home

While American families who bought a home before the Great Recession were likely most concerned with the interest rates of their home loan, today’s millennials might be more preoccupied with the interest rates and repayment plans on their student loans.

Nearly 70 percent of bachelor’s degree recipients leave school with debt. Student loan debt is one of the largest burdens carried by Americans today, second only to mortgage debt. As a result, it comes as no surprise that student loan debt may be holding back millennials, especially older millennials, from buying a home.

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A Preview of the 2017 NCLR Annual Conference Workshops

The 2017 NCLR Annual Conference, which will take place in Phoenix, provides a platform to engage and unite the Latino community. For years, we have proudly exhibited our growth and success during our Conference, representing the largest gathering of the nation’s most influential people, organizations, institutions, and companies working with the Hispanic community.

The 2017 NCLR Annual Conference consists of four days of cutting-edge workshops focused on addressing critical issues in the Latino community. It includes five meal events with appearances by influential and notable speakers who will address attendees on topics related to the Conference’s goal of enriching and advancing the Latino community in the United States.

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Treasury’s Financial Regulation Report: A Wall Street Wish List

By Renato Rocha, Policy Analyst, Economic Policy Project, NCLR

This week the U.S. Department of the Treasury released a report to the president that outlines recommendations to rollback critical safeguards, including consumer protections that were put in place in the wake of the Great Recession. The Treasury report comes less than a week after the U.S. House of Representatives passed the Financial CHOICE Act, legislation that would deregulate financial institutions and expose our entire economy to a heightened risk of instability.

The Treasury’s proposals are straight from a Wall Street wish list, as the proposals effectively  gut the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB).

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An Age-Old Story Meets 21st Century Technology

By Laura Vazquez, Program Manager, Immigration Initiatives, NCLR

Erie Neighborhood House has a long history of helping immigrants get integrated into American society.

NCLR Affiliates have a long history of assisting eligible permanent residents in applying for citizenship. For decades, our Affiliates have worked to integrate America’s newcomers by helping them learn English, apply for citizenship, and then assisting them with registering to vote so that they can fully participate in our democracy.

One such Affiliate is Erie Neighborhood House. Erie was originally founded in 1870 as a settlement house that served immigrants in Chicago. When Erie’s work began, Chicago’s immigrant communities were mostly Dutch, Norwegian, Swedish, and German.

Fast forward to 2017 and Erie is still working to incorporate immigrants into the strong communities that contribute to the vibrancy of Chicago. Its English classes are now made up of immigrants mainly from Latin America who came to Chicago for a better life as previous groups of immigrants have done.

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DACA Requests Continue to Be Received and Processed, but Communities Should Be Cautious

On June 7, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS)—the federal agency in charge of processing all immigration-related services—released data on applications filed under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) policy. The data confirm that, in the first three months of the Trump administration, USCIS has continued to receive and process DACA requests at similar levels to those during the previous year.

Between January and March 2017, USCIS approved 107,524 DACA renewals and 17,275 new applications. The numbers are comparable to the previous three-month period (October to December 2016).

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