Sea Mar Health Centers Reaches Migrant Farm Worker Families Where They Are

As part of our work with Red Nose Day to come together to end child poverty, one nose at a time, we launched the Healthy and Ready for the Future initiative in 2016. The program provides a healthy start in oral health and early education for Latino children from migrant and seasonal farmworker families across rural America.

We invited one of our Affiliate partners on this initiative, Sea Mar Community Health Centers, a federally qualified health center (FQHC) in Seattle, Wash., to share their experiences working with migrant and seasonal farmworker families.  

By Jennifer Vigil, Dental Program Manager, Sea Mar Community Health Centers

Sea Mar Community Health Centers Staff. Photo: Sea Mar Community Health Centers Facebook page.

Washington state boasts an abundance of rich terrain: lush rain forests, lakes, rivers, streams, majestic mountains, miles of tulip fields, and acres upon acres of agricultural farmland as far as the eye can see. Woven in the fabric of this landscape is a population of equally beautiful, hard-working, humble, and underserved people—migrant farm workers.

For decades, Sea Mar Community Health Centers have extended hands and hearts to provide basic health care services to the state’s growing population of migrant farm workers. In the many clinics throughout Western Washington as well as rural outreach programs, Sea Mar teams have joined forces to meet people where they are. This frequently means caring for patients in one of our 22 urban clinics, or establishing tents and mobile clinics in rural agricultural communities.

The effect on the lives of those served is nothing short of beautiful.

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Trump’s Budget: A Slash-and-Burn Approach that Will Hurt Americans

Today the president released his first full budget proposal for the fiscal year 2018, and it’s as bad as we expected. Included in the plan are drastic cuts to many of the most successful assistance programs that have helped working and middle-class families move ahead during tough economic times. It would cut $1.7 trillion in funding that provides a lifeline to millions of Americans, and it would gut key programs that help families afford food, housing, and health care.

A budget is a moral document that should reflect our values. The Trump Budget is an assault on children and working families.

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It’s Time to Get Those Noses On!

Red Nose Day is almost here! But you don’t have to wait for May 25 to do your part to put an end to child poverty. Last week, we shared a story about how Red Nose Day’s support of NCLR has helped us connect Yesenia Chavez with affordable dental services in her home town. Through our Healthy and Ready for the Future campaign, and with Red Nose Day’s support, we’ve made more than 18,500 referrals. And more than 7,300 children received dental services.

We’re glad to have the support and we know that thousands of kids will have bigger and brighter smiles thanks to having access to a dentist. Continue reading

The Trump Budget: Padding the Wallets of the Wealthy at Your Expense

By Amelia Collins, Policy Analyst, NCLR

Photo: peasap

Next Tuesday, the Trump administration is expected to release its full fiscal year 2018 (FY18) budget request, which will be a blueprint for funding levels for federal programs. Many of those programs, like nutrition assistance for families, affordable housing initiatives, early childhood education opportunities, and Medicaid and Social Security, help millions of Americans.

If the “skinny budget” Trump released in March is any indication, the full Trump budget will gut programs that provide basic living standards for millions of low-income Americans to pay for tax cuts for millionaires, to increase defense spending, and to ramp up immigration enforcement by funding an unnecessary wall and a deportation force.

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Let’s Not Turn Back the Gains We’ve Made in Advancing Women’s Health

As we close National Women’s Health Week, we recognize the tireless contributions women have made in the overall health and well-being of our country. These contributions not only are reflective in the local community-based health programs and services that our Affiliate Network of community-based organizations and community health centers lead, but also in the leadership roles that they represent both regionally and nationally.

Thanks to the Affordable Care Act (ACA), we have seen major gains in access to affordable, quality, and equitable health care for women and children. Prior to the ACA, 36 percent of Latinas ages 15–44 were uninsured. In two years, that rate dropped to 25 percent. The ACA has provided millions of previously uninsured Latinas access to essential health care services and coverage.  Key preventive and sexual health services include breast and cervical cancer screenings, immunizations, breastfeeding counseling and support, domestic violence screening and support, and prenatal screenings, including gestational diabetes screening for women at high risk and folic acid supplements, that are offered at no additional cost.

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