Make Your Voice Heard – Protect Our Care!

If the Affordable Care Act is repealed, 30 million more Americans, including 6.5 million Latinos, stand to lose their coverage, and millions more will likely be harmed. From California’s Central Valley to Miami, Americans are showing up and speaking out to demand “no repeal without replace”. Now, we’re asking you to join this growing chorus of concerned Americans.

This weekend and in the coming days, as Members of Congress go back to their districts for the President’s Day recess (February 18-26), they need to hear from YOU, their constituents, about what having health coverage means to you and your loved ones and why as a nation we cannot afford to go backwards when it comes to the gains we’ve made.

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D.C. Circuit Court Decision Is a Victory for Consumers

By Renato Rocha, Policy Analyst, Economic Policy Project, NCLR

Yesterday, the United States Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit agreed to rehear a case, PHH Corp. vs. CFPB, that would have seriously weakened the efficacy of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB).

Last October, a three-judge panel attempted to make it easier to remove the director of the consumer agency, allowing the president to fire the director at will. The full federal appeals court decided that it will revisit the issue at a hearing in May, effectively scrapping this earlier decision, and allowing the CFPB’s structure to continue as Congress intended.

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Making Mental Health Services Work for Latino Youth

Bringing mental and behavioral health programs into schools increases early access to interventions, reduces the stigma around mental health issues, and normalizes the need for a healthy, supportive environment in schools. These were some of the issues addressed during last week’s Facebook Live event in celebration of National School Counselor Week, where NCLR’s Deputy Research Director Patricia Foxen was joined by Lourdes Rubio, Licensed Professional School Counselor for Arlington Schools, and Marisa Parrella, Senior Clinical Manager at Mary’s Center, for a discussion on school-based mental health programs for Latino students.

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Rep. Price Is a Dangerous Pick to Lead Nation’s Healthcare System

Despite the immense gains Latinos have made under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), the U.S. Senate voted to confirm an outspoken enemy of the landmark law, Rep. Tom Price (R-Ga.), to lead the Department of Health and Human Services. Given his well-known animosity toward providing affordable care to more Americans, we are very disappointed in the result of the final vote. We will be vigilant in monitoring his agency, and we’ll hold him accountable for his actions as secretary.

“Rep. Price has a dangerous track record of championing legislation that would take health coverage away from many Americans­ – including millions of Latinos,” said NCLR President and CEO Janet Murguía. “This includes championing efforts to repeal the ACA, along with efforts to cut Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program.”

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How Do We Ensure Personalized Learning is a True Equity Initiative?

By Maria Moser, Senior Director of Teaching and Learning, NCLR and Ace Parsi, Personalized Learning Partnership Manager, National Center for Learning Disabilities.

Personalized learning is the new “it” in education. This approach, often defined by flexible learning environments that meet student interests, assets and challenges, has achieved the mantle of educational panacea, and has plenty of smart, committed advocates highlighting its potential as a game changer in educational equity conversations. Representing equity groups working in this space, we remain cautiously optimistic, knowing that there’s inevitably a gap between aspirations and reality and closing that gap demands a lot of work.

Like other advocates, we are excited by the potential of personalized learning to better serve students with disabilities (SWDs) and English Language Learners (ELLs). In principle, personalized learning invites students to demonstrate learning in multiple ways and address skills and topics at a flexible pace. It creates a systemic lens that not only identifies student challenges—and subsequently directs more timely supports to address those challenges—but also builds off students’ strengths and interests. In a world where skills such as self-advocacy, collaboration and communication are as important as content mastery, the personalized learning movement seems to demand high expectations and opportunities to develop these 21st-century competencies for all learners. Last, but not least, personalized learning builds off proven practice in serving students with disabilities and ELLs such as personalized plans, cultural responsiveness, and universal design for learning.

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