New Survey Shows Voters See Undocumented Immigrants in a Positive Light

The narrative of undocumented immigrants as criminals and cheaters that is being peddled by folks like Donald Trump is false, and there is data to prove it. 

This week, at a briefing at NCLR Headquarters, George Washington University Professor Michael Cornfield presented findings of new research that explores the attitudes among American voters toward undocumented immigrants. The data show that most U.S. voters have positive views of undocumented immigrants when it comes to their character, motivation, and impact on our nation.

“Among American voters today, there is a substantial, multidimensional and widespread favorable attitude toward undocumented immigrants,” said Dr. Cornfield, Associate Professor of Political Management and Research Director, Global Center for Political Engagement, The George Washington University. “Political strategists and policymakers should take these majority attitudes into serious consideration.”

The study, “Broad Sympathies and Borderline Myths shows that most voters see undocumented immigrants positively, saying they are “family- and community-oriented” (71 percent), and “filling jobs Americans don’t want” (67 percent). In fact, a majority of those surveyed (59 percent) disagreed with the sentiment that they are ‘cheaters’ here to just help themselves, or that they “belong to gangs and commit crimes” (56 percent).

To provide some historical context to the report, journalist and Wilson Center public policy scholar Edward Shumacher-Matos joined the panel.

“We have seen Donald Trump types throughout American history make such vile comments and for a while it appeals to people’s fears,” said Schumacher-Matos. “In the 19th century, it appealed to a populist movement that proudly called itself the ‘Know-Nothings’ and who accused Irish Catholic immigrants of being apelike and criminals. But sooner or later, as this poll shows, the vast majority of Americans catch on.”

Katie Packer, of Republican consulting firm Burning Glass, also joined the briefing to underscore that disparaging immigrants is a losing strategy for her party.

Our study of GOP primary voters in early states along with general election voters in swing states indicates that the strongest candidate is one who supports a multistep path toward legal status for undocumented immigrants, along with much stronger border security,” said Packer. “This combination of accountability and compassion is the sweet spot for a majority of American voters.”

“The findings show that the majority of voters disagree with Donald Trump’s offensive remarks, and that demonizing immigrants will not win the White House,” said our own Clarissa Martínez-De-Castro, Deputy Vice President, Office of Research, Advocacy and Legislation. “The vast majority of Americans are in a much more pragmatic place than Congress on this issue, and they believe immigrants make valuable contributions to our nation.”

See the full presentation of the briefing here.

We Remain Committed to Keeping Families Together

Demonstrators joined our Affiliate, Latin American Coalition, in North Carolina last week for a DAPA Day of Action, part of rallies that happened all across the country.

Demonstrators joined our Affiliate, Latin American Coalition, in North Carolina last week for a DAPA Day of Action, part of rallies that happened all across the country.

This week, the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals denied the Department of Justice’s request for an emergency stay to lift an injunction against the president’s administrative relief programs, expanded Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA+) and Deferred Action for Parents of Americans and Lawful Permanent Residents (DAPA), so they could move forward. The court’s decision leaves in limbo millions of American families as they wait to apply for the two programs.

This is not the end of legal proceedings on this matter, however, as an appeal of the preliminary injunction is scheduled for the week of July 6. While this is a setback, this is not the end of the long and arduous legal road. It is important to note that the Fifth Circuit Court has still not decided on the full appeal of the case to lift the injunction.

“Our community remains steadfast in our commitment to keeping hardworking families together,” said Clarissa Martinez-De-Castro, NCLR Deputy Vice President of the Office of Research, Advocacy and Legislation, in a statement. “Not only will these executive actions bring relief to millions of American families, they are in the best interest of this nation’s economy and national security.”

Martinez-De-Castro further highlighted how those who are blocking relief in order to settle a score with the president are alienating the large and influential voting bloc of Latinos who “will remember these very personal attacks on our families and our community come Election Day,” said Martínez-De-Castro. “It should not be lost on anyone that a key function of the president is to nominate federal judges, and for the Senate to ‘advise and consent’ to those nominations. We will continue to remind our community that by exercising their power at the ballot box, they can help determine who will be making judicial decisions that, with the stroke of a pen, can snatch potential lawful status away from millions.”

This Week in Immigration Reform — Week Ending May 22

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Week Ending May 22

This week in immigration reform: NCLR and others raise awareness on original DAPA implementation date; NCLR continues blog series on deferred action recipients; and an update on state-level activity.

NCLR and advocates participate in National Day of Action in support of DAPA: This Tuesday was the original date the Obama administration would have begun accepting applications for Deferred Action for Parents of Americans and Lawful Permanent Residents (DAPA). However, that deferred action program that would bring relief to millions of people is currently on hold, pending an appeal in the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals. Our press statement notes: “Instead of celebrating with the millions of families who would finally gain a reprieve from the needless separations that have torn apart our communities, today we continue to navigate this drawn-out, unnecessary litigation that has left so many American families in limbo,” said Clarissa Martínez-De-Castro, Deputy Vice President of the Office of Research, Advocacy and Legislation at NCLR (National Council of La Raza). “By pursuing this lawsuit, the opponents of these programs accomplish nothing beyond damaging our economy, jeopardizing our national security and attacking Latino families.” A decision from the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals is expected any day now, although there is no deadline for a decision.  For more information on the possible litigation scenarios, check out this document from the National Immigration Law Center.

Studies show DAPA would benefit the American economy. A piece from the Center for American Progress outlined how: “DAPA would result in a cumulative gross domestic product, or GDP, increase of $164 billion, an $88 billion increase in incomes for all Americans, and create 20,538 jobs per year over the next 10 years. Moreover, DAPA would result in payroll tax increases of $16.7 billion over five years.”

NCLR compiled tweets from fellow advocates supporting DAPA on May 19. See them in our blog.

NCLR blog features DACA recipient Jose Alguiluz: This week’s installment of our ‘Living the American DREAM’ blog profiles a DREAMer from Honduras. When he was 15-years-old he came to the U.S. to receive medical treatment at John Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland. He attended Montgomery College and applied for DACA once it was announced in 2012. DACA enabled Jose to fulfill his dream of becoming a nurse and since January 2014 he has been employed at Washington Adventist Hospital as a registered nurse. Jose also finds time to advocate for his fellow DREAMers and he worked to pass the Maryland DREAM Act. He also is a member of NCLR Affiliate CASA de Maryland’s Board of Directors. Jose is continuing his studies and hopes all those in his community can realize their potential through deferred action.

State Updates: 

  • This week the Nebraska legislature voted to reverse a policy denying driver’s licenses to DACA recipients. A Star Tribune article notes that Arizona and Nebraska were the only states where those granted deferred action were ineligible for licenses. The Arizona law was blocked by the court last July. DACA recipients are now eligible for a driver’s license in all fifty states.
  • Controversial Arizona Sheriff Joe Arpaio’s racial-profiling case is costing Arizona taxpayers millions of dollars. A New York Times article notes the county has already doled out $45 million and more costs are expected to materialize. Unrelated to the racial-profiling case, the county has also paid out $74 million to cover other judgments, settlements and legal fees due to lawsuits involving Arpaio and his office.

This Week in Immigration Reform — Week Ending March 6

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Week Ending March 6

This week in immigration reform: Nearly 300 community leaders participated in National Latino Advocacy Days,Congress funds the Department of Homeland Security; and NCLR continues a new blog series highlighting the impact of administrative relief.

Braving the weather, hundreds attend National Latino Advocacy Days: This Wednesday, nearly 300 Latino leaders from across the country participated in a day-long event promoting advocacy for Latino priorities. Attendees represented 24 states, Puerto Rico and the District of Columbia. Check out tweets and photos from the event on Twitter with #NLAD15. Also, take a look at NCLR’s Facebook photo album on why Latinos vote.

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Latino Advocacy Days followed the NCLR Capital Awards where NCLR recognized the work of Senator Cory Booker (D-N.J.) and honored longtime immigration reform advocate, Frank Sharry. During her remarks, NCLR President and CEO Janet Murguía warned the Republican Party about the political consequences of their rhetoric and policies that are adversely affecting not only the Latino community, but the entire nation’s best interests. You can see Janet’s speechhere.

Congress passes DHS funding bill without harmful immigration amendments: This week the House of Representatives passed a bill to fund the Department of Homeland Security through the end of this fiscal year. This was after much political maneuvering and uncertainty. House Democrats joined with Republicans to pass the version of the bill that passed in the Senate, one that removed the harmful language defunding President Obama’s executive actions on immigration. NCLR applauds the passage of a clean DHS funding bill.

Also this week, House Republicans found time for a two-day markup of four-immigration related bills. These bills would promote a national racial profiling protocol, take an ineffective enforcement-only approach to fixing our immigration system, and would deny due process to some of the most vulnerable immigrants: child refugees. In a statement, NCLR’s Clarissa Martínez-De-Castro said “These bills are a conscious, premeditated attack against millions of American families and a direct blow at the heart of the Latino community. They are representative of the backward thinking that has replaced a solution-driven approach to immigration in Washington, and they show a disregard for the civil rights of all Americans.”

Second installment of our blog profiling deferred action success stories: This week’s “Living the American DREAM” blog post features Steven Arteaga Rodriguez, a 19-year-old from Houston and a DACA recipient who was brought to the United States when he was four months old. Steven got the chance to meet with President Obama to discuss how his executive actions have impacted the lives of immigrants and their families. DACA enabled Steven to search for work without fear of deportation. To continue the success of deferred action programs, Steven urged his fellow DREAMers to apply, saying “If we don’t apply, we don’t take this opportunity, we wouldn’t be where we are now. We’ve gotten this far, and it wouldn’t be fair for all those DREAMers that fought if, you know, not everybody applied.”