Giving Credit Where it’s Due: Latinos and Credit Scores

By Agatha So, Policy Analyst, Economic Policy Project, NCLR
Family in front of house

In the run up to the Great Recession, Latinos and other low-income homebuyers of color more often than not received higher-priced mortgage loans than White borrowers. Today, Latinos and low-income communities of color are still being short-changed in the mortgage market.

In 2015, few mortgages were made to Latino and Black borrowers, with 8% of all home purchase loans made to Latinos, and only 5% going to Black borrowers. Tight lending standards have made it difficult for millions of Americans to buy a home since the Great Recession, especially for Latinos and low-income families with credit scores below 700. While the minimum credit score needed to qualify for a home loan has increased by 40 points, the credit scores of Latinos who receive mortgages have increased by nearly 80 points since 2000.  Moreover, Latino borrowers are less likely than White borrowers to have a credit score and full credit history, making them appear riskier to lenders than they really are.

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