This Week in Immigration Reform — Week Ending July 15

Immigration_reform_Updates_blue

Week Ending July 15

This week in immigration: New toolkit released for schools to welcome immigrants and refugees; New York announces it will cover citizenship application fees for 2,000 immigrants; and Federal Reserve presidents call for immigration reform to boost the economy.

White House releases resources for educators on immigrant integration: In coordination with the White House’s announcement of “Bright Spots” on welcoming and expanding opportunity for Linguistic Integration and Education, the Department of Education released a guide for schools to support immigrants, refugees, and their families with a successful integration process. The Newcomer Toolkit provides information, resources and examples of effective practices that educators can use to support newcomers in our schools and communities. Lessons include understanding legal obligations to newcomers, providing welcoming schools and classrooms for newcomers and their families, and supporting students’ social emotional skills.

Continue reading

Small Steps to Revive the American Dream of Homeownership

Family in front of housePresident Obama recently gave a speech in Arizona announcing a reduction in mortgage insurance premiums charged by the Federal Housing Administration (FHA). This much-needed policy change will save homeowners with FHA loans an average of $900 a year on their mortgage payments while making the dream of homeownership more affordable and easier to reach for many Americans, including Latinos.

Unfortunately, the key message and potential benefits to hard-working Americans were lost following the announcement. Conservative policymakers were quick to invoke a deeply entrenched false narrative that attributes the collapse of the housing market to unqualified borrowers. For example, House Financial Services Committee Chairman Jeb Hensarling (R–Texas) released a statement calling the reduction in FHA premiums disappointing and warned against “the destructive cycle of boom, busts, and bailouts that poor decisions in Washington produce.

Regrettably, comments like this from Hensarling and others distract from the large body of evidence confirming that the foreclosure crisis was a result of unscrupulous lenders steering minority borrowers into costly subprime loans. The Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission, studies by economists at the Federal Reserve, and a number of other independent investigations have all shown that the housing crisis stemmed from private-sector lenders chasing profits by producing large volumes of unsustainable loans without regard for borrowers. The Department of Justice reached historic settlements with large lenders charged with steering Black and Hispanic borrowers into predatory subprime products, even when these borrowers qualified for safer conventional mortgages. Additionally, a recent study by a private consulting firm refutes the idea that mortgage credit was easily attainable leading up to the housing market’s collapse. Using 10 years of mortgage originations, the study finds denial rates were actually higher before the crisis than they are in today’s tight credit market. Yet, just as banks and other financial institutions received taxpayer bailouts, they responded by restricting access to affordable mortgage credit to only the most pristine borrowers.

This restrictive environment is where we find ourselves today. Access to affordable mortgage credit continues to be a real barrier to homeownership, especially for qualified Latinos and other underserved markets. The reduction in mortgage insurance premiums from the FHA is expected to provide some relief to put many qualified Americans on the path to homeownership and better financial prospects. We hope that in the future, policymakers stop blaming victims of the foreclosure crisis and we encourage the Obama administration to continue doing more to put the dream of homeownership back within reach of Latino families.

Weekly Washington Outlook – March 10, 2014

U.S. Capitol

What to Watch This Week:

Congress:

The House:

The House meets Tuesday to vote on eight measures under suspension of the rules.  These include several health-related bills passed out of the Ways and Means Committee, a measure to commemorate former Czech President Vaclav Havel, and a resolution condemning Russian interference in Ukraine.  On Wednesday and Thursday the House will consider a bill (H.R. 3973) that would require the Attorney General to submit a report to Congress if any federal official foregoes enforcing an enacted law.  On these days the House will also take-up a measure (H.R. 4138) that would allow Congress to take legal action against the Administration for failing to execute laws and another (H.R. 3189) that would bar the Departments of Agriculture and Interior from requiring private entities from transferring water rights as a condition for using federal lands.  Finally, on Friday, the House will vote on H.R. 4015, a permanent “doc fix.”  This bill would alter the Medicare Sustainable Growth Rate, the formula used to reimburse physicians.

The Senate:

The Senate convenes Monday evening and is scheduled to vote on passage of S. 1917 (Sen. McCaskill), a bill that addresses sexual assault in the military by changing the way these cases are handled within the military chain of command.  This week the Senate will also consider a series of judicial and Executive nominations and will begin resume consideration of S. 1086, the reauthorization of the Childcare and Development Block Grant program.

White House:

On Monday, the president will host a reception for the 2012 and 2013 NCAA Division I Men’s and Women’s Champions.  On Tuesday, President Obama will travel to New York City to attend DNC and DSCC events.  The president will also attend unspecified meetings in the White House the balance of the weekContinue reading

Weekly Washington Outlook – December 16, 2013

U.S. Capitol

What to Watch This Week:

Congress:

The House:

The House is in recess, returning January 7th.

The Senate:

The Senate wraps up its work for the year this week with consideration of several executive nominations, including Jeh Johnson as Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security on Monday and Janet Yellen to Chair the Federal Reserve later in the week.

On Tuesday, the Senate will vote on cloture on a motion to concur with the House-passed changes to the budget vehicle, H.J. Res. 59 and passage later in the week.  The House amended H.J. Res. 59 with the language of the Murray-Ryan bipartisan budget agreement as a means to expedite its consideration.

On Wednesday, the Senate will vote on cloture on a compromise defense authorization, H.R. 3304 which passed in the House last week.  The scaled back measure provides the Department of Defense, Department of Energy, and other agencies $625.1 billion in base and war funding for FY2014.  The bill would also require the Defense Department to address sexual assault cases and limits the transferring of detainees from Guantanamo Bay to the United States.  A vote on passage is expected later in the week.

White House:

The White House this week did not release a detailed schedule.  President Obama is expected to give a press conference at some point this week and is otherwise attending unspecified meetings.  On Friday, the President and the First Family will leave for Hawaii for the holidays.  Continue reading

Weekly Washington Outlook – December 2, 2013

Congress Instagram

What to Watch This Week:

Congress:

The House: The House will reconvene Monday afternoon to consider three bills under suspension of the rules. The most notable among these is a measure by Rep. Howard Coble (R-N.) that would extent an existing law for ten years requiring guns to be manufactured with metal components to ensure they can be detected by X-ray machines and security devices. On Tuesday the House will take up nine more minor bills under suspension of the rules that relate to the Transportation Security Administration and natural resources issues. The remainder of the week, the House will consider the Small Business Capital Access and Job Preservation Act (H.R. 1105) sponsored by Rep. Robert Hurt (R-Va.) and may also take-up a patent troll bill sponsored by Rep. Bob Goodlatte (R-VA).

The Senate: The Senate is in recess, returning December 9th.

White House: On Monday, the president will deliver remarks from the White House in observance of World AIDS Day. On Tuesday, Mr. Obama will welcome President Santos of Colombia to the White House. On Wednesday, the president will deliver remarks on the economy at the Center for American Progress. On Thursday, he will host a Hanukkah reception at the White House. The president and the First Family on Friday will attend the National Christmas Tree Lighting also at the White House.  Continue reading