Five Ways You Can Take Action to Protect Our Care

“Save the ACA”
Rally in Support of the Affordable Care Act, at The White House, Washington, DC USA, see https://www.facebook.com/events/1425620610816402/

Thanks to your efforts, and the efforts of millions of Americans, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) is still the law of the land. However, this fight is not over. Our health and the health of our community remains under attack.

Last month, the latest effort to repeal the ACA failed. If passed, the repeal bill, named the American Health Care Act (AHCA), would cause 24 million Americans to lose health coverage and cut Medicaid by around $800 billion over 10 years. However, rather than move on from a bill that only 17 percent of Americans support, Members of Congress want to revive this bad bill, and make it even worse.

Continue reading

Gutting Essential Health Benefits Hurts All of Us

Under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), over four million Latino adults and 600,000 Latino children have gained health coverage. But beyond these important gains, the ACA does something else.

The ACA ensures that every health plan covers at least these 10 “essential health benefits”:

  • Hospitalizations
  • Doctors’ visits
  • Prescription drugs
  • Mental health and addiction treatment services
  • Pregnancy, maternity, and newborn care
  • Rehabilitative and habilitative services and devices
  • Laboratory services
  • Preventive care, wellness services, and chronic disease management
  • Pediatric services, including oral and vision care for children

Continue reading

The Affordable Care Act is Under Attack

On March 23, 2010, President Obama signed the Affordable Care Act (ACA) into law. Seven years later, over four million Latino adults have gained health coverage. The fact that more Latinos are covered than ever before is something to celebrate, maintain, and build upon. However, not everyone feels that more people having quality, affordable health care is worth celebrating. Today, the House GOP Leadership is expected to hold a vote to gut the ACA and replace it with their proposal that would kick millions of children, seniors, and families off their insurance.

To mark the seventh anniversary of the ACA, we are highlighting five aspects of the law that benefit the Latino community, plus two aspects of the House GOP proposal that would harm Latino families and children.

Continue reading

The House Health Care Plan: Bad Medicine for Children and Families

By Janet Murguía, President and CEO, NCLR

Some simple ways to evaluate the new congressional health care plan: when children are covered, they are healthier and do better in school. If they stay healthy, they will have more opportunities as adults. When families are covered, they are better protected from crippling medical debt and homelessness. When more people are covered, our country’s productivity and economic well-being are secured.

The “American Health Care Act” that House congressional leaders proposed last week will drop millions of children and working families from their Medicaid programs. It dismantles health care as we know it, trading in coverage of our nation’s most vulnerable populations for a financial windfall benefiting the wealthy few. And in an analysis released just this week, the Congressional Budget Office gave us our clearest picture yet of the harm the GOP proposal would inflict. The CBO estimates that 14 million people would lose coverage by 2018, 24 million by 2026, and federal Medicaid spending would be reduced by $880 billion over the next 10 years. In short, the historic coverage gains we’ve made over the past few years would be wiped away.

Continue reading

Latino Child Health Coverage Rate Reaches Record High, But Threats Loom

By Steven T. Lopez, Manager, NCLR Health Policy Project, and Sonya Schwartz, Research Fellow, Georgetown University McCourt School of Public Policy’s Center for Children and Families

Latino children with health coverage reached a record high 92.5 percent in 2015, the second year after key provisions of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) took effect, according to our new joint report with the Georgetown University Center for Children and Families. These gains are part of larger overall coverage gains for America’s children. For the first time in U.S. history, more than 95 percent of all children have health coverage.

But until every child has the opportunity to receive health coverage, it is crucial for us to continue to build on the progress that has already been made.

Looking back more than a decade, we can see just how far we have come in covering more Latino children. In 2000, around 26 percent of Latino children were uninsured. Fast forward to 2013, right before major coverage provisions of the ACA took effect, and two million Latino children, or 11.5 percent, were uninsured.

Continue reading