NCLR Goes to NASA for 2016 STEM Youth Summit

With Space City as our backdrop, NCLR recently welcomed Latino students and teachers from our national Escalera network to Houston for the 2016 NCLR STEM Youth Summit, generously supported by Shell and Chevron. Young Latinos had the opportunity to immerse themselves in the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines through a variety of hands-on activities and educational workshops. The STEM Youth Summit was not just a weekend of science exploration, but of STEM empowerment.

The goal for the NCLR Líderes team was to create a space where Latino youth could freely tap into their potential and see STEM careers as realistic, attainable goals. The team did this through exposure to Mobile Oil field exhibits, a NASA tram tour, as well as a screening of the documentary Underwater Dreams, which included remarks from Oscar Vazquez, a STEM-advocate and U.S. Army veteran who is featured in the film.

During the STEM Life Map workshop, Latino engineers shared their individual journey into STEM and offered participants a chance to learn from their experiences. Their stories shed light on some of the structural and academic barriers that continue to plague the Latino STEM pipeline, as well as the cultural ones that often go unaddressed. One speaker, Stephanie Garza, commented on the lack of support she received at home when she first mentioned wanting to become an engineer. Though her family members doubted her ability to thrive in a male-dominant field, Garza pushed on and went on to become a power solutions engineer. Her story and those of others echoed the power of strength and perseverance.

We rounded off our first night in Houston with a celebratory dinner where we welcomed Vazquez to join us. Before a crowd of more than 120 students and teachers, he recounted his remarkable story of entering—and beating the Massachusetts Institute of Technology—in a national underwater robotics competition with three of his high school friends. He also spoke at length about the tremendous hardship he faced as an undocumented student. Vazquez noted the need to broaden opportunities for all Latinos regardless of their immigration status, and urged Latino students to dream as big as he once did.

Meet the Future of Latino STEM Professionals: Rosa Reyes

The Lone Star State is the setting for NCLR’s 2016 STEM Youth Summit this January at the Johnson Space Center in Houston. The STEM Youth Summit, generously supported by Shell Oil, is designed to expose Latino youth to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines through hands-on exploratory activities and engagement. At the event, students will have the opportunity to work closely with Latino STEM professionals who seek to increase the number of underrepresented youth in STEM fields. Participants will also have the opportunity to collaborate with other youth from our national Escalera network. As the Summit draws nearer, we’ll be featuring some of the remarkable young people, in their own words, who look forward to attending this year’s event. Today’s spotlight is on Rosa Reyes, a senior at George I Sanchez High School.     

Rosa Reyes_blogsizeHi, I’m Rosa. I’m 17 years old and both of my parents are from Mexico, but I was born here. I want to major in Nursing and minor in Finance. One of my hobbies is photography.

I got involved in the NCLR Escalera program when I was a junior during my second semester. My teacher, Mr.Carillo, was going into classes and recruiting for the Escalera Class and I signed up. My favorite part of the NCLR Escalera STEM program is that we get to experience college tours that give us better understanding about the university and what they have to offer.

NCLR Escalera STEM has supported me by showing me how to manage my budget, calculate cost of attendance, apply for college, register for ACT/SAT test, and more. I did not know what STEM was before joining this program. I have learned not only what STEM means, but also that my career goals and interests fall within STEM fields.

From participating in the program I had the opportunity to meet professors, industry professionals and gain valuable experience during my accounting internship. Learning how to approach my parents with my plans of attending a university away from home has also given me the confidence that I really can make a difference in the statistical boundaries that Hispanic women face within STEM fields. I will highly recommend this program to my friends.

Meet the Future of Latino STEM Professionals: Damián Aragonez

The Lone Star State is the setting for NCLR’s 2016 STEM Youth Summit this January at the Johnson Space Center in Houston. The STEM Youth Summit, generously supported by Shell Oil, is designed to expose Latino youth to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines through hands-on exploratory activities and engagement. At the event, students will have the opportunity to work closely with Latino STEM professionals who seek to increase the number of underrepresented youth in STEM fields. Participants will also have the opportunity to collaborate with other youth from our national Escalera network. As the Summit draws nearer, we’ll be featuring some of the remarkable young people, in their own words, who look forward to attending this year’s event. Today’s spotlight is on Damián Aragonez, a student at West Jefferson High School and Puentes New Orleans in Louisiana.

DamianAragonezHi! My name is Damián Aragonez. I like to be outgoing, positive, and a great friend. I am Mexican, but was born in Galveston, Texas. I love that my culture includes plenty of food and music, not to mention motivation. My hobbies are listening to music, playing sports such as soccer and football, and especially spending time gaming with my little brother.

I originally became involved with NCLR STEM as an official member through my sister, Jessica Aragonez, who was in NCLR STEM last year and is now in college. My favorite part of the program is the communication that goes on in the program and having snacks is fun too. NCLR STEM has supported me by keeping me on track and broadening my vision of responsibility.

I knew about STEM before joining this program because I wanted to be an engineer. However, the NCLR STEM program has given me more knowledge and support in finding opportunities in STEM fields. I would absolutely recommend this program to my friends because it helps you set your goals and sets you on a better path.

Meet the Future of Latino STEM Professionals: Kenia Cruz

The Lone Star State is the setting for NCLR’s 2016 STEM Youth Summit in Houston this coming January at the Johnson Space Center. The STEM Youth Summit, generously supported by Shell Oil, is designed to expose Latino youth to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines through hands-on exploratory activities and engagement. At the event, students will have the opportunity to work closely with Latino STEM professionals who seek to increase the number of underrepresented youth in STEM fields. Participants will also have the opportunity to collaborate and work with other youth from our national Escalera network. As the Summit draws nearer, we’ll be featuring some of the remarkable young people, in their own words, who look forward to attending this year’s event. Today’s spotlight is on Kenia Cruz, a student at West Jefferson High School in New Orleans, La.

Kenia photoHi! I’m Kenia Cruz, a proud Latina.

I’m from La Ceiba, Honduras and moved to New Orleans last year. My culture is full of food, fiestas, and of course, la familia. Spending time with my family and wanting them to be proud of me is my goal.

I got involved in Escalera STEM at school, when my counselor talked to me about it. My favorite part of the program is preparing myself for my future and making new friends. I think that what is fun about this program is always learning and doing something new each day.

Escalera STEM has showed me that being Latino does not have to stop me from achieving my goals. I did not know what STEM was before this program. I have learned that STEM applies to many careers and I have learned more about each field and the careers available.

Check back here for more spotlights on NCLR STEM Youth Summit participants. You can visit nclr.org/issues/education for more information on youth-oriented programs.

Meet the Future of Latino STEM Professionals: Enrique Alba

The Lone Star State is the setting for NCLR’s 2016 STEM Youth Summit in Houston this coming January at the Johnson Space Center. The STEM Youth Summit, generously supported by Shell Oil, is designed to expose Latino youth to science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) disciplines through hands-on exploratory activities and engagement. At the event, students will have the opportunity to work closely with Latino STEM professionals who seek to increase the number of underrepresented youth in STEM fields. Participants will also have the opportunity to collaborate and work with other youth from our national Escalera network. As the Summit draws nearer, we’ll be featuring some of the remarkable young people, in their own words, who look forward to attending this year’s event. Today’s spotlight is on Enrique Alba, a senior at George I. Sanchez Charter School in Houston.

Enrique photo_noncroppedI’m Enrique Alba. I’m 18 years old. I was born in Houston but my parents were born in Mexico. I’m currently a senior at George I. Sanchez Charter School. In my spare time I like to draw and paint portraits.

I got involved in the NCLR Escalera program during my junior year after my teacher recommended the class. My favorite part about the program is that you get to experience college tours. I enjoy getting a better understanding about how college is important and the guidance offered throughout my senior year has been invaluable.

NCLR Escalera STEM has supported me by teaching me how to manage my college budget, and showing me what to expect during my first year of college. Thanks to Escalera I have already applied to four different Tier 1 universities and will be making my decision on which one to attend once my financial aid packages have been determined.

As an artist, I have learned that while STEM has predominately been known as Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics, the new trend is to now call it STEAM. The introduction of Arts is something that has really interested me as I have begun to build my portfolio and hope to study Studio Art after high school.

Check back here for more spotlights on NCLR STEM Youth Summit participants. You can visit nclr.org/issues/education for more information on youth-oriented programs.